Tropical storm formation
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Edit Date: 2016-06-04 18:54:30
Question:

Picture taken from http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=87314

Each year several tropical storms hit Florida, USA, causing damage and sometimes even deaths and injuries.


A tropical storm forms when sea water temperature is 26 degrees or

higher.


The intensity of a topical storm is measured by winds velocity. There are 5 categories 1-5 from low to high speed this is the Saffire Simpson hurricane scale those numbers will appear on the storm in the video.


A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when the central turbulence becomes an eye, and sustained winds reach at least 120 Km/h.


In the following videos below, the course of hurricane Katrina(2005) is illustrated.

The second video demonstrate low pressure maintained by the hot air and vapor elevation and its contribution to storm intense..

An accompanying table containing characteristic information for 9 tropical storms that hit Florida in the past, follows.


The above animation is aderivation from a simulation  produced by the Climate Change Narrative Game Education (CHANGE) project with funding from the USF National Science Foundation, grant # DRL-1316782.

The above animation is aderivation part from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7533909.stm#blq-nav

Storm

name

Year

Highest winds

Lowest pressure

Damage

Comment

  

km/h

Millibar

Millions of US Dollars

 

Wilma

2005

295

882

20,000

 

Katrina

2005

280

902

102,000

Hit a big city: NewOrleans

Ivan

2004

270

910

20,000

 

Charly

2004

240

941

16000

 

Isaac

2012

130

965

2400

 

Lee

2011

95

986

1600

 

Erika

2015

85

1001

500

 

Bonnie

2010

75

1005

1

 

From the 4 options below, which deduction is the most correct according to the video and accompanying data?
Question Created By: Darian Ryder
Creation Date: 2016-05-03 15:46:10
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