Tropical storm formation
Question:

Picture taken from http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=87314

Each year several tropical storms hit Florida, USA, causing damage and sometimes even deaths and injuries.


A tropical storm forms when sea water temperature is 26 degrees or

higher.


The intensity of a topical storm is measured by winds velocity. There are 5 categories 1-5 from low to high speed this is the Saffire Simpson hurricane scale those numbers will appear on the storm in the video.


A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when the central turbulence becomes an eye, and sustained winds reach at least 120 Km/h.


In the following videos below, the course of hurricane Katrina(2005) is illustrated.

The second video demonstrate low pressure maintained by the hot air and vapor elevation and its contribution to storm intense..

An accompanying table containing characteristic information for 9 tropical storms that hit Florida in the past, follows.


The above animation is aderivation from a simulation  produced by the Climate Change Narrative Game Education (CHANGE) project with funding from the USF National Science Foundation, grant # DRL-1316782.

The above animation is aderivation part from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7533909.stm#blq-nav

Storm

name

Year

Highest winds

Lowest pressure

Damage

Comment

  

km/h

Millibar

Millions of US Dollars

 

Wilma

2005

295

882

20,000

 

Katrina

2005

280

902

102,000

Hit a big city: NewOrleans

Ivan

2004

270

910

20,000

 

Charly

2004

240

941

16000

 

Isaac

2012

130

965

2400

 

Lee

2011

95

986

1600

 

Erika

2015

85

1001

500

 

Bonnie

2010

75

1005

1

 

From the 4 options below, which deduction is the most correct according to the video and accompanying data?
0 People tried to answer this question

A tropical storm intensifies while moving from the oceans over land, if the barometric pressure declines.
A tropical storm weakens while moving from continental land to the oceans if the barometric pressure decreases.

A tropical storm intensifies if water temperature is rising, ocean water area increas while the barometric pressure declines.

A topical storm intensifies during its oceanic course if the water temperature decreases.



Comments:
1.  Klein Oded (2022-05-20 16:00:00)
Feedback
Dear Group,
The following is my feedback according to the guidelines set in the syllabus:
1. Following your questions, I found the correct answer in first attempt assisted by the explanations in the question. 
2. The simulation has a poor contribution to your question. It didn't help me. 
3. The scale table (better to present The Saffir-Simpson scale) seems to be not so accurate. I suggest to check the units and numbers. You wrote Km/hr but some of the date is in Mph. 
4. There are only two map points with date and the two are similar. Both describes Katerina Hurricane when your question refers to a much more scientific issue. it will be better if you bring more examples and simulation of Hurricane phenomenon.
3. I have added a new point in the map and attached a great simulation made by the BBC weather unit : http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7533909.stm
I suggest to add this simulation as well. 

2.  (25.05.2016 am 10.33.59)
Thank you for your helpful comment

Hello Oded,

Thank you for your helpful comment, we took your comment sincerely.

First We changed the correct question making it more connected to the simulation.

Second we adopt part of the BBC demo as small film, demonstrate the air flow and low pressure maintenance.

3.  Ronen Hanni (29.05.2016 pm 07.09.23)
Feedback
Hi folks, 
Thanks for your question: I had a challenge solving it! 
I've read it several times until I could choose the right answer: I wans't sure about the pressure part...
 
There is surely a strong correlation between your question, the data you've added and the location stated. 
The textual information helps to understand that tropical storm is caused by high sea water temperature (= 26 degrees or higher) and high winds velocity; 
However, as mentioned before, the pressure part wasn't clear to me: 

The second video part you've added wasn't clear to me; though its description was helpful. ("...demonstrates low pressure maintained by the hot air and vapor elevation and its contribution to storm intense" - meaning the pressure should be low!) 

I think you should either omit this video - but leave the fact about the low pressure - or add the video's full version; or at least leave some text of its presentation, so that people can understand that you're talking about low pressure. 
(I watched the full presentation of the second video and I think it's better to include it all. But, of course, it's your decision). 

An idea for improvement: 
If you like, you can add  a picture of a hurricane, taken by NASA, after mentioning it in your question! (After the sentence: "A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when the central turbulence becomes an eye, and sustained winds reach at least 120 Km/h."). It doesn't really improve your question - it won't really help to understand the issue - but I believe it can make people to enjoy your question more! :) 
And it surely visualizes the fact you're mentioning about the hurricane "eye". 

The link to the picture: 

https://www.google.co.il/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjhhZDe0__MAhXFcBoKHf15D5YQjRwIBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fplanetsave.com%2F2012%2F11%2F09%2Fthe-deadliest-u-s-hurricanes-infographic%2Fhurricane_isabel_from_iss%2F&psig=AFQjCNErhGwgwOyrDpeU_ppEuIh-KmMXQQ&ust=1464624003922387

or: 

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=87314
http://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/87000/87314/Pali_tmo_2016011_lrg.jpg

(in case you didn't like the first one... :-) ) 

Best regards, 
- Hanni 
4.  Barham Rana (29.05.2016 pm 10.16.29)
comment
Hi Guys, 
The topic you chose to talk about is very interesting, the question is challanging.
1. I think there are a good corelance between the question and the attached animation. However, still can't deduce the answer only depending on the two attached videos due to lack of information. For example, it was not clear the purpose of the number in the clouds ( eye ) in the first animation, untill I read about the saffir-scale in one point. the second video was not clear for me at all .

2.As I mentioned before, the points were very helpfull and contributed for understanding the described phenomenon.

3. The suggested animations and pictures presented by another students are very relevant and effective for improving the question's content. It's critical for me to emphesize the importance of replacing the  second animation into another video which explains the  " low pressure " better.
5.  (04.06.2016 pm 07.21.23)
thank you for yours helpfull suggestions

Hello,

Thank you for the most helpful and contributing suggestions.

We took your suggestions into our minds and did following them some Improvements

  1. Adding NASA picture at the beginning of the question.

  2. Adding better explanation to the second movie. by the way it was proposed in the first suggestion we got.

Thanks again

Tropical Storm Team

 



History of edits
Edited BY: Edit Date: 2016-06-04 18:59:42
Edited BY: Edit Date: 2016-06-04 18:54:30
Edited BY: Edit Date: 2016-06-04 18:51:11
Edited BY: Edit Date: 2016-06-04 15:34:32
Edited BY: Edit Date: 2016-06-04 14:46:55
Edited BY: Edit Date: 2016-05-25 08:59:38