How do soap clean your hands ?
Question:

Watch the video below and then answer the question 


The picture below will help you to understand more!


You can also watch this video :                                                                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjZDTiV2s_w

According to the video ,answer the question below:

How do soap and water clean our hands ?

3 People tried to answer this question

The hydrophobic ends of the soap molecules attach to the oil molecules, while the hydrophilic ends of the soap molecule attach to the water molecules. These drops of oil are suspended in the water. This is how soap cleans our hands - it causes drops of grease and dirt to be pulled off your hands and become suspended in water. These drops are washed away when you rinse your hands.
The hydrophobic ends of soap molecule all attach to the water molecules, while the hydrophilic ends attach to the oil molecules.
Soap breaks up the water in to smaller drops, which then mix with the oil. These drops are washed away when you rinse your hands.
Soap breaks up the oil in to smaller drops, which then mix with the water. The hydrophobic ends of the soap molecules all attach to the oil, while the hydrophilic ends of the soap molecules attach to the water molecules. These drops of oil are suspended in the oil. This is how soap cleans our hands.



Comments:
1.  Mir Debby (2006-12-20 15:00:00)
Suggestions

Answer 4 is very similar to Answer 1, which is confusing.

I made some changes to the English you may want to use:


1. The hydrophobic ends of the soap molecules attach to the oil molecules, while the hydrophilic ends of the soap molecule attach to the water molecules. These drops of oil are suspended in the water.

This is how soap cleans our hands - it causes drops of grease and dirt to be pulled off your hands and become suspended in water. These drops are washed away when you rinse your hands.


2.

Soap breaks up the water in to smaller drops, which then mix with the oil. These drops are washed away when you rinse your hands.


3.

Hydrophobic ends of soap molecule all attach to the water molecules, while the hydrophilic ends attach to the oil molecules.


These drops of oil are suspended in the water. This is how soap cleans our hands - it causes drops of grease and dirt to be pulled off your hands and become suspended in water. These drops are washed away when you rinse your hands.


4.

Soap breaks up the oil in to smaller drops, which then mix with the water. The hydrophobic ends of the soap molecules all attach to the oil, while the hydrophilic ends of the soap molecules attach to the water molecules. These drops of oil are suspended in the oil. This is how soap cleans our hands.




2.  kablan farida (2011-12-20 15:00:00)
Feedback

Hi Safaa

I like the question, the topic related to everyday life and shows that chemistry happens around us everyday, not just in a lab.  I liked the video and the way you used to explain what happened, good job.

It will be more useful to add a simulation and pictures, which shows how soap works.

I added  a link (contains video with simulation that explain how soap works) and photos that can be useful for you.

Also it will be more attractive if you use "attractive title",  like: "How do soap clean your hands ?" , or " Discover the secret of  the soap action".

Your point on map is very interesting and related to the topic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjZDTiV2s_w

              

Good Luck,

Farida


More information about the history of  soap:

In Chemistry, soap is a salt of a fatty acid. Consumers mainly use soaps as surfactants for washing, bathing, and cleaning.

The earliest recorded evidence of the production of soap-like materials dates back to around 2800 BC in ancient Babylon. A formula for soap consisting of water, alkali, and cassia oil was written on a Babylonian clay tablet around 2200 BC.
The Ebers papyrus (Egypt, 1550 BC) indicates the ancient Egyptians bathed regularly and combined animal and vegetable oils with alkaline salts to create a soap-like substance. Egyptian documents mention a soap-like substance was used in the preparation of wool for weaving.
In the reign of Nabonidus (556–539 BC), a recipe for soap consisted of uhulu, cypress [oil] and sesame [seed oil] "for washing the stones for the servant girls".







3.  kablan farida (2014-12-20 15:00:00)
more information

Synthetic detergents operate by similar mechanisms to soap.

A detergent is a surfactant or a mixture of surfactants with "cleaning properties in dilute solutions."  These substances are usually alkylbenzenesulfonates, a family of compounds that are similar to soap but are more soluble in hard water, because the polar sulfonate (of detergents) is less likely than the polar carboxyl (of soap) to bind to calcium and other ions found in hard water. In most household contexts, the term detergent by itself refers specifically to laundry detergent or dish detergent, as opposed to hand soap or other types of cleaning agents. Detergents are commonly available as powders or concentrated solutions. Detergents, like soaps, work because they are amphiphilic: partly hydrophilic (polar) and partly hydrophobic(non-polar). Their dual nature facilitates the mixture of hydrophobic compounds (like oil and grease) with water. Because air is not hydrophilic, detergents are alsofoaming agents to varying degrees.








4.  shehadeh marlene (2014-12-20 15:00:00)
question review
hi Safaa,
i liked the topic , it relates an every day product to chemistry and demonstrates an interesting phenomenon. 

i have a few remarks:
1-the answers are very long and they look too similar , it may confuse the person reading.

2- your point on the map talked about the origin of the name soap, and it mentioned the roman empire , but it was located in panama in south america, why is that? why did you put the point there?

3- you need to add animation or some images or a video to the point on the map to make it more informative

good luck ,
Marlene
5.  Awwad Safaa (2005-01-20 16:00:00)
Replay for Deby

Hi Debby;

Thank you for your help, I used the changes that you made on the answers

Hope you enjoyed the question and the video.

Good luck

Safaa

6.  Awwad Safaa (2005-01-20 16:00:00)
Replay for Farida

 

Hi Farida;

Thank you for your suggestions

I used some of them, like the video from YouTube and the title .

Hope you enjoyed the question and the video.

 

Good luck

Safaa

 

7.  Awwad Safaa (2005-01-20 16:00:00)
Replay for Marlene

Hi Marlene;

Thank you for the remarks!

I fixed the point on the map I didn’t pay attention that it was on the wrong place.

I added some pictures and video for Illustration too.

 

Good luck

Safaa

 



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